How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

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How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

Post  ElectricMonk on Wed May 09, 2012 3:33 am

Welcome to Monks Character Creation Guide! (A work in progress)

Greetings and salutations prospective kobold fodder adventurer!
The goal of this simple and easily digestible guidebook is to better prepare you for the exciting life of an adventurer and the untimely death fabulous riches that accompany it! To begin with, let us determine your basic abilities. To the more seasoned adventurers, feel free to skip on a bit.

CHAPTER ONE: Abilities

Section 1: Assigning Ability Scores
To better equip you for the adventures awaiting you, Sight and myself have removed the "luck" factor and are introducing a fabulous new Point Buy System. (Game Masters Guide Page 169)

It works thusly,

Each of your abilities (STR, DEX, etc) starts at 8. To raise any stat from this value, costs a number of points equivalent to the new stat. How much does each stat cost? BEHOLD A TABLE!!! Revel in it's tableness!

Ability Score Point Cost
9 1
10 2
11 3
12 4
13 5
14 6
15 8
16 10
17 13
18 16

Thus, if Mike the Cleric chooses to raise his Strength from 8 to 9, it only costs him one point, but raising it to 18 costs him sixteen points.
Important: You only pay the final cost for any ability. Thus an 18 strength, costs me sixteen points total.

For this campaign, you shall have 28 points to allocate to your abilities. Spend them wisely!

For those that are curious, there is a write up and description of each ability on page 8 of the player handbook. It's worth reading, as I'm not going to go into that sort of depth here, but I will touch on a few highlights.

Strength determines how frequently and how hard you strike things. It's highly important for Fighters and Barbarians.

Dexterity provides a bonus to your armor class, making you harder to hit, and more adept and moving quietly and shooting things from a distance. It's most important to Rogues.

Constitution
determines how many hit points you have, and how generally tough you are. It's fairly important to everyone.

Intelligence determines how many spells a wizard can memorize in a day, and the number of skill points you recieve. It's most important to Wizards

Wisdom is important to Will saving throws, and provide clerics and paladins with additional spells. It's most important to those classes.

Charisma is the stat used to measure influence over others, but it also determines how many spells a Sorceror can cast.


ABILITY MODIFIERS

Next to where you record your ability, you'll notice a box for modifiers. The truth is, ability numbers are simply too large to add on the fly, so we simplify it by breaking it down into modifiers. The number that you've written for your ability score directly corresponds to a smaller modifier number. It looks like this, the number on the left being the ability score or range of scores, and the number on the right being the modifier.





1........................ -5
2-3 .................... -4
4-5..................... -3
6-7 ...................... -2
8-9 ...................... -1
10-11 ...................... 0
12-13 .................. +1
14-15 .................. +2
16-17..................... +3
18-19 ..................... +4
20-21 ....................+5
22-23 .................... +6
24-25 ...................... +7
26-27 ...................... +8
28-29 .................. +9
30-31 ..................... +10
32-33 .......................... +11
34-35 ......................... +12
36-37 ........................... +13
38-39......................... +14
40-41 ......................... +15
42-43 .........................+16
44-45 ...........................+17
etc. . .

Go ahead and find the modifiers for all your abilities and record them on your character sheet now.


Last edited by ElectricMonk on Tue May 15, 2012 2:37 am; edited 5 times in total
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Re: How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

Post  ElectricMonk on Wed May 09, 2012 5:20 am

CHAPTER TWO: Choosing race and class.

Now that you're done with abilities, the next step is to choose both your class and race. Each race will have negatives and bonuses that will both change your abilities, as well as provide extra powers.

Race Ability Adjustments Favored Class
Human None Any
Dwarf +2 Constitution, -2 Charisma Fighter
Elf +2 Dexterity, -2 Constitution Wizard
Gnome +2 Constitution, -2 Strength Bard
Half-elf None Any
Half-Orc +2 Strength, -2 Intelligence, -2 Charisma Barbarian
Halfling +2 Dexterity, -2 Strength Rogue

Any ability change occurs right now, as soon as you choose your race. You'll note the row for "favored class." This is only for advanced users, and is used when multi-classing. Most users will likely not need this, but for those planning on taking levels as a second class, may want to keep this in mind.

In addition to ability score changes, you may pick up additional abilities. Always read your race entry to find out! While I'd certainly recommend reading the entries in the players hand book, here's some quick guides to each race.

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Once you're done with this, read the class entries and choose one. Remember, just like when you chose a race, choosing a class will provide you with special talents or abilities. Be sure to read up on them! Go on, I'll wait here.

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A MATTER OF CLASS: HIT POINTS

Hit points are determined based on a Hit Die (HD). Each class has it's own Hit Die, abbreviated by the number of sides on the die.

HD Type Class
d4 Sorceror, Wizard
d6 Bard, Rogue
d8 Cleric, Druid, Monk, Ranger
d10 Fighter, Paladin
d12 Barbarian

For first level, take the maximum you could've rolled, and add your Constitution modifier to it.

Example: Mike's Cleric has a d8 Hit Die, and a Constitution modifier of +1. That gives him a total of 9 Hit Points for starting.

A MATTER OF CLASS: SAVING THROWS

Saving throws are essentially a resistance check. Every time your Rogue tries to jump out of the way of the party Wizards poorly placed fireball, or every time your Fighter shrugs off that mind control spell, they're making a saving throw. Saving throws are essentially a "bonus" added on to a d20 roll.

Your class determines your base saving throw. Each class has it's own chart, but to simplify things I'm going to show each classes starting saving throws in one combined chart.

ClassFortitude Save Reflex Save Will Save
Barbarian +2 +0 +0
Bard +0 +2 +2
Cleric +2 +0 +2
Druid +2 +0 +2
Fighter +2 +0 +0
Monk +2 +2 +2
Paladin +2 +0 +0
Ranger +2 +2 +0
Rogue +0 +2 +0
Sorcerer +0 +0 +2
Wizard +0 +0 +2

Record these numbers in the Base Save box next to the relevant saving throw. You'll notice another box next to that labelled "ability modifier." The relevant ability is listed in the box with the name of the saving throw. If you have a modifier for it, place that here and add it to the Base Save. Record the total in the.. well, the "Total" box.

A MATTER OF CLASS: BASE ATTACK BONUS

The Base Attack Bonus gets added in to every attack roll that you make, and is thus vitally important in seperating dead adventurers from successful ones. And just like with saving throws, each class gets it's own chart to show it's advance. Again, for simplicities sake, I'll list them here.

Barbarian +1
Bard +0
Cleric +0
Druid +0
Fighter +1
Monk +0
Paladin +1
Ranger +1
Rogue +0
Sorcerer +0
Wizard +0


Last edited by ElectricMonk on Wed May 09, 2012 5:07 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

Post  ElectricMonk on Wed May 09, 2012 1:38 pm

By this point, we should have a class, a race, hitpoints, and saving throws. Not too shabby. Next up are...

SKILLS

When you're not enthusiastically punching things in the face (And who am I to tell you not to?) there are all manner of other things you could be doing. Researching spells, picking the parties pockets, conning Mike the Cleric into giving you his stuff. These are all skill checks. And much like earlier, these numbers get added in to a d20 roll. The basic format is thus:

Ability Modifier + Skill Ranks + Misc. Modifiers (Magic, Racial bonuses, from gear, etc.) = Skill Modifier

Note that you'll probably not have any Misc. Modifiers to add in here, though an example would be a Halflings +2 to Move Silently. The Ability modifier you put in the box, is the one listed next to it as the "key ability"

So how do you get skill ranks? Much like with Saving throws and hit die, it's all based on your class. So, here's another cheat sheet!

Class Skill Points at 1st level Skill points at each additional level
Barbarian (4+Int Modifier)x44+Int Modifier
Bard (6+ Int Modifier)x4 6+ Int Modifier
Cleric (2+Int Modifier)x4 2+Int Modifier
Druid (4+Int Modifier) x4 4+Int Modifier
Fighter (2+Int Modifier)x4 2+Int Modifier
Monk (4+Int Modifier) x4 4+Int Modifier
Paladin (2+Int Modifier)x4 2+Int Modifier
Ranger (6+Int modifier)x4 6+Int Modifier
Rogue (8+Int Modifier)x4 8+Int Modifier
Sorcerer (2+Int Modifier)x4 2+Int Modifier
Wizard (2+Int Modifier)x4 2+Int Modifier

Remember! If you're playing as a human, you get 4 extra skill points, so be sure to add those in!

Now that we've established how many points you have to spend, I suppose now would be a good time to discuss where to spend them. In the description for your class, you'll see a section labelled Class Skills. These are the skills your character is likely to be trained in, so they come cheap. 1 Skill Point gets you 1 Rank in a skill.

As a level one player, the maximum rank you can have in a starting skill, is 4


Of course, your character may have picked up a more obscure skill here and there in the past, and far be it from us to deny it to you. However, we call these "Cross-Class Skills" and they're a bit more expensive. Cross-Class Skills cost 2 skill points to get 1 skill rank. As a level one player, the maximum rank you can have in a cross-class skill is 2.

To the right of some skill names on your character sheet, you'll notice a black box. This denotes that that skill can be used untrained, that is, without any skill ranks spent on it! In this event, you'd add the modifier of the relevant ability, plus any Misc. modifiers you have, and then would attempt a role.

Example: The Party has just finished sacking the mayors manor, and now they attempt to make a getaway, leaping from the second floor balcony onto their waiting steeds in truly dramatic fashion. Unfortunately, Mike the Cleric didn't put any points into riding. Thankfully, he can still make an attempt. Sadly, Mike rolls a 2. Adding in his Dex Modifier of +2, and the bonus from his +2 Boots of Competent Riding (patent pending) that still leaves him at not-so-hot 6, and the GM rules that Mike is barely clinging to his saddle as his horse rampages out of control



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Re: How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

Post  ElectricMonk on Wed May 09, 2012 2:35 pm

If you're not playing a caster, you may want to skip ahead a bit. But for the Sorcerers, Wizards, and Clerics of the party, this is for you.

SPELLS

The focus of this particular guide is on the acquisition of first level spells, and their use. Later, I may post an advanced guide to magic, but for now, this will get you started. Everyone will need to keep this table in mind:
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This represent bonus spells you may get by having a high enough associated ability. That would be Intelligence for Wizards, Charisma for Sorcerers, Wisdom for Clerics.

Wizards

Starting Spells: All of the Cantrips, Three 1st level spells of your choosing, +1 Bonus 1st Level Spell per point of Intelligence Modifier.

Example: Yossarian the Great and Terrible, as a 1st level Wizard gets Three 1st level spells. His unholy intelligence of 18 gives him a +4 modifier. Thus Yossarian starts the game with a total of Seven 1st level spells


Spell preparation: Wizards carry spellbooks, which are essentially like a collection of Instruction Manuals to manipulating arcane energy. To prepare new spells, a Wizard must have time to study these manuals and prepare the spells. This requires at least 8 hours of rest.

Spells per Day:
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This table represents the base number of spells per day that a Wizard can prepare.

SORCERER
Starting Spells: 4 Cantrips, 2 first level spells. Note: A High Charisma does not provide a Sorcerer with more known spells, rather it allows him to cast those spells more frequently each day.

Number of spells that can be cast per day: 5 Cantrips, 3 first level spells +Plus any bonus spells provided by having a high charisma.

Spell Preparation: None. You lucky, lucky, bastard.

CLERICS
starting spells: Actually, clerics have access to all of the spells of a spell level to which they have access. The only limit ofcourse, is on how many of them they can prepare in a given day.

Spells per day: 3 Cantrips, 1 first level spell, 1 domain spell. + spells provided for having a high Wisdom.
Spell preparation: A cleric draws it's power from it's diety. Thus, to prepare new spells, a Cleric must set aside one hour of prayer and meditation a day.

Clerics and Domains: A cleric must choose either a Deity to follow, or if not a Deity, at least an Alignment.
When choosing a deity, a cleric can pick two of that Gods associated domains to receive spells from. If a Cleric chooses to instead simply follow an Alignment, he must still choose two domains from which to draw additional spells.
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FEATS

Post  ElectricMonk on Wed May 09, 2012 5:03 pm

FEATS

The next step is fairly straightforward. In the players handbook you'll find a list of feats. Read over them, and feel free to pick one that you like that you meet the requirements for:
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Important: Every character starts with 1 feat, with two exceptions:
1) Human characters get 1 extra bonus feat at first level.
2) Fighters get 1 extra bonus feat at first level. This feat MUST be one of the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] and you must meet the minimum requirements for said feat.

Take a look, and pick what you like!

With that, we've finished the bulk of the work. All that's left now are the little personal touches, then purchasing your starting gear!

(more to come!)


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Re: How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

Post  ElectricMonk on Thu May 10, 2012 12:23 pm

MONEY MONEY MONEY MONEY! (moooooooooney!)

Alright, once again, this is based on your class. And once again, I have produced a glorious table.

Class Starting Gold
Barbarian 4d4 X 10
Bard 4d4 X 10
Cleric 5d4 x 10
Druid 2d4 x 10
Fighter 6d4 x 10
Monk 5d4
Paladin 6d4 x 10
Ranger 6d4 x 10
Rogue 5d4 x 10
Sorcerer 3d4 x 10
Wizard 3d4 x 10

Simply find your class, roll the number of dice listed, add them all up and multiply them by the number listed. (Unless you're playing a Monk. They don't get a multiplier. Sad Monk is broke.)

So, now you have some cash. I'd highly recommend buying stuff. Remember, if it's not on your character sheet, you don't have it. Thus, I would highly recommend buying clothing. And maybe a bag. Again, while I'd recommend flipping through the players handbook, here's some links for quick reference!

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Note: Whatever funds you have left over, stay with your character. So be sure to leave yourself a couple of gold pieces for "traveling money"


Now that you have presumably bought some armor (Except for most of you Wizards. Sorry fellas, but that's what Mage Armor is for! Alternatively, that's why we have spell failure chances) It's time to discuss how Armor Class works.

ARMOR CLASS

So if I may direct your attention to the Armor Class box on your Character Sheet (Abbreviated AC).

Everything in the D&D Universe has a starting AC of at least 10. Think of AC 10 as a person standing perfectly still outside without any protective gear. The first thing we'll add to that is some armor.

When you purchased your armor, it had a Armor Bonus. Record that in the appropriate box, just to the right of that big 10. Now, if you're a fighter you might have a shield as well, and that also adds a Shield bonus, so you can add that number on their as well (Again, in the appropriate box).

Size modifier? What I mean is, small creatures are a little harder to hit. For example Gnomes get a +1 size modifier to their Armor Class. (Check your race entry!) If you have one of those, add that in too.

What about a Dexterity modifier? Do you have one of those? Great, there's just one thing: Just as every piece of armor offers a bonus, it also has what we call a Maximum Dex Bonus. Just as Big Heavy Armor offers a huge AC boost, it also inhibits your ability to move quickly and get out of the way of attacks.
Thus, the Maximum Dex Bonus of your Armor is the maximum Dex Modifier you get to add to your AC.

For Instance, Mike the Cleric has a Dex Modifier of +4, but he's wearing chainmail, which has a Maximum Dex Bonus of +2. So Mike only gets two points of his Dex Modifier to add to his Armor Class. That makes his final Armor Class: 10 (the base) +5 (chainmail) +2 (the allowed portion of his Dex Modifier) for a total Armor Class of 17.

Your Armor Class is the number that your enemies have to roll to do actual damage to you, thus it's best to keep it as high as possible, or to get out of the way!


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Re: How Do I Shot Web? (Also, notes on character creation!)

Post  ElectricMonk on Thu May 10, 2012 1:18 pm

ALIGNMENT: The Good, The Bad, and the Neutral.



In Dungeons and Dragons, there is a concept called "Alignment." This is a two word description that sums up your character's outlook on life. For you, it's rather simple, but for your character this sums up entire philosophies. There are two parts of alignment: Your characters outlook on law and order, and your characters feelings towards Good or Evil. I could write up descriptions, but in truth, your players handbook does a decent job and I'd only end up repeating it fairly closely. Here's a link for quick reference:

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FINISHING TOUCHES:

With that done, you're left with a character. Of course, he's not much of a character yet, is he? Give him some personality, a backstory, and tell your GM (Sight, or myself).

Also, how tall is he? How old? Does he have any flaws? Is he greedy, or altruistic? Perhaps he is a devout follower of a Deity, or perhaps he's an Atheist. These things are all up to you, and are just as important as everything we've done thus far. And so I will leave your character in your vary capable hands. Have fun, and I'll see you 'round the gaming table.
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